Arch Linux Docker

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You can run Compose on macOS, Windows, and 64-bit Linux.

  1. When the UID of an unprivileged Linux user on the host collided with the file owner or group inside a container, the unprivileged Linux user on the host could discover, read, and modify those files. This bug has been fixed in Moby (Docker Engine) 20.10.9. Users should update to this version as soon as possible.
  2. Create a shortcut for Windows to start WSL with created user. Arch.exe config — default-user yourusername. Additionally, you can run Docker by installing the Docker binary sudo pacman -S.

# docker pull alpine Alpine Linux uses the musl libc implementation instead of the glibc libc implementation used by most Linux distributions. Because Arch Linux uses glibc, there are a number of functional differences between an Arch Linux host and an Alpine Linux container that can impact the performance and correctness of software. Arch Linux Netboot; Vagrant images. Vagrant images for libvirt and virtualbox are available on the Vagrant Cloud. You can bootstrap the image with the following commands: vagrant init archlinux/archlinux vagrant up Docker image. The official Docker image is available on Docker Hub. You can run the image with the following command: docker run. After the announcement for the new Linux build agents I looked into my sample whoami repo that builds a multi-arch Docker image that works both for Linux and Windows. I was curious to find out how the Linux builds work on AppVeyor.

Prerequisites

Docker Compose relies on Docker Engine for any meaningful work, so make sure youhave Docker Engine installed either locally or remote, depending on your setup.

  • On desktop systems like Docker Desktop for Mac and Windows, Docker Compose isincluded as part of those desktop installs.

  • On Linux systems, first install theDocker Enginefor your OS as described on the Get Docker page, then come back here forinstructions on installing Compose onLinux systems.

  • To run Compose as a non-root user, see Manage Docker as a non-root user.

Arch Linux Docker Desktop

Install Compose

Follow the instructions below to install Compose on Mac, Windows, Windows Server2016, or Linux systems, or find out about alternatives like using the pipPython package manager or installing Compose as a container.

Install a different version

The instructions below outline installation of the current stable release(v1.29.2) of Compose. To install a different version ofCompose, replace the given release number with the one that you want. For instructions to install Compose 2.0.0 on Linux, see Install Compose 2.0.0 on Linux.

Compose releases are also listed and available for direct download on theCompose repository release page on GitHub.To install a pre-release of Compose, refer to the install pre-release buildssection.

Install Compose on macOS

Docker Desktop for Mac includes Compose alongwith other Docker apps, so Mac users do not need to install Compose separately.For installation instructions, see Install Docker Desktop on Mac.

Install Compose on Windows desktop systems

Docker Desktop for Windows includes Composealong with other Docker apps, so most Windows users do not need toinstall Compose separately. For install instructions, see Install Docker Desktop on Windows.

If you are running the Docker daemon and client directly on MicrosoftWindows Server, follow the instructions in the Windows Server tab.

Install Compose on Windows Server

Follow these instructions if you are running the Docker daemon and client directlyon Microsoft Windows Server and want to install Docker Compose.

  1. Start an “elevated” PowerShell (run it as administrator).Search for PowerShell, right-click, and chooseRun as administrator. When asked if you want to allow this appto make changes to your device, click Yes.

  2. In PowerShell, since GitHub now requires TLS1.2, run the following:

    Then run the following command to download the current stable release ofCompose (v1.29.2):

Docker

Note: On Windows Server 2019, you can add the Compose executable to $Env:ProgramFilesDocker. Because this directory is registered in the system PATH, you can run the docker-compose --version command on the subsequent step with no additional configuration.

  1. Test the installation.

Install Compose on Linux systems

On Linux, you can download the Docker Compose binary from theCompose repository release page on GitHub.Follow the instructions from the link, which involve running the curl commandin your terminal to download the binaries. These step-by-step instructions arealso included below.

For alpine, the following dependency packages are needed:py-pip, python3-dev, libffi-dev, openssl-dev, gcc, libc-dev, rust, cargo and make.

  1. Run this command to download the current stable release of Docker Compose:

    To install a different version of Compose, substitute 1.29.2with the version of Compose you want to use.

    If you have problems installing with curl, seeAlternative Install Options tab above.

  2. Apply executable permissions to the binary:

Note: If the command docker-compose fails after installation, check your path.You can also create a symbolic link to /usr/bin or any other directory in your path.

For example:

  1. Optionally, install command completion for thebash and zsh shell.

  2. Test the installation.

Alternative install options

Install using pip

For alpine, the following dependency packages are needed:py-pip, python3-dev, libffi-dev, openssl-dev, gcc, libc-dev, rust, cargo, and make.

Compose can be installed frompypi using pip. If you installusing pip, we recommend that you use avirtualenv because many operatingsystems have python system packages that conflict with docker-composedependencies. See the virtualenvtutorial to getstarted.

If you are not using virtualenv,

pip version 6.0 or greater is required.

Arch Linux Docker-compose Not Found

Install as a container

Compose can also be run inside a container, from a small bash script wrapper. Toinstall compose as a container run this command:

Install pre-release builds

If you’re interested in trying out a pre-release build, you can download releasecandidates from the Compose repository release page on GitHub.Follow the instructions from the link, which involves running the curl commandin your terminal to download the binaries.

Pre-releases built from the “master” branch are also available for download athttps://dl.bintray.com/docker-compose/master/.

Pre-release builds allow you to try out new features before they are released,but may be less stable.

Upgrading

If you’re upgrading from Compose 1.2 or earlier, remove ormigrate your existing containers after upgrading Compose. This is because, as ofversion 1.3, Compose uses Docker labels to keep track of containers, and yourcontainers need to be recreated to add the labels.

If Compose detects containers that were created without labels, it refusesto run, so that you don’t end up with two sets of them. If you want to keep usingyour existing containers (for example, because they have data volumes you wantto preserve), you can use Compose 1.5.x to migrate them with the followingcommand:

Alternatively, if you’re not worried about keeping them, you can remove them.Compose just creates new ones.

Uninstallation

To uninstall Docker Compose if you installed using curl:

To uninstall Docker Compose if you installed using pip:

Got a “Permission denied” error?

If you get a “Permission denied” error using either of the abovemethods, you probably do not have the proper permissions to removedocker-compose. To force the removal, prepend sudo to either of the abovecommands and run again.

Where to go next

compose, orchestration, install, installation, docker, documentation

This article or section needs language, wiki syntax or style improvements. See Help:Style for reference.

Reason: Formatting does not comply to the guidelines, see Help:Style. (Discuss in Talk:Install Arch Linux via Docker)

This document is a guide for installing Arch Linux using the official [Arch Linux docker](https://hub.docker.com/_/archlinux). For alternative means of installation, see Category:Installation process.

Before installing, it would be advised to view the FAQ. For conventions used in this document, see Help:Reading. In particular, code examples may contain placeholders (formatted in italics) that must be replaced manually.

For more detailed instructions, see the respective ArchWiki articles or the various programs' man pages, both linked from this guide. For interactive help, the IRC channel and the forums are also available.

Arch Linux should run on any x86_64-compatible machine with a minimum of 512 MiB RAM, though more memory is needed to boot the live system for installation [1]. A basic installation should take less than 2 GiB of disk space. As the installation process needs to retrieve packages from a remote repository, this guide assumes a working internet connection is available. Furthermore a working Docker setup on the host is required. While technically it is certainly possible to use any qemu supported host to install Arch with, this guide will not cover this however.

Pre-installation

This guide assumes that the host system is already pre-configured with regards to normally expected things. E.g. the time is setup correctly, internet connection is working normally, EFI mode if required is setup correctly etc.

Prepare an installation medium

The installation requires a target directory to which Arch Linux will be installed. Any writable directory can be used, but it is quite likely that the target directory has a partition or volume mounted that will server as the root disk.

Full disk partitions

If a full disk is being used as a target, it may need to be formatted. For details see Installation guide#Partition the disks as the same partitioning instructions and order can be followed from there. All the same restrictions and requirements as from there apply as well.

Likewise, the new disk will also needed to be formatted. The instructions from Installation guide#Format the partitions can be used for this as well.

Volumes

When using filesystems such as btrfs or zfs, filesystem volumes are an option to use. Depending on what filesystem is used, creating them uses their own list of commands. In this guide, btrfs will be used as an example.

First, a root volume for Arch Linux is created. This command assumes the current working directory is the btrfs root volume (subvolid=5), but anywhere could be used. If a different location is used, within an existing hierarchy, keep this in mind when later defining fstab and similar. Also note, that as the Arch Linux specific volume is created on a mounted (root) volume, it could be the case that the underlying stack is using (full)disk encryption.

Installation

Launching the container

The remainder of the installation will be done inside a docker container, abbreviated with ADC, Aarch Docker Container.

Select the mirrors

Packages to be installed must be downloaded from mirror servers, which are defined in /etc/pacman.d/mirrorlist. In the docker container we first install reflector, which updates the mirror list by choosing 70 most recently synchronized HTTPS mirrors and sorting them by download rate. [2]First we have to installreflector in the docker container to be able to use it.

The higher a mirror is placed in the list, the more priority it is given when downloading a package. Ensure to inspect the file to see if it is satisfactory. If it is not, edit the file accordingly, and move the geographically closest mirrors to the top of the list, although other criteria should be taken into account.

This file will later be copied to the new system by pacstrap, so it is worth getting right.

Install essential packages

Make sure that arch-install-scripts is installed in the Docker container. Then follow Installation guide#Install essential packages to install packages into /target using the pacstrap(8) script.

Configure the system

Follow the instructions in Installation guide#Configure the system. Replace /mnt with /target as appropriate.

Reboot

Exit the docker container by typing exit or pressing Ctrl+d.

Optionally manually unmount all the partitions with umount -R '/target': this allows noticing any 'busy' partitions, and finding the cause with fuser(1).

With a correctly setup boot loader, a reboot should now be possible into the freshly installed Arch Linux.

Post-installation

Nginx

See General recommendations for system management directions and post-installation tutorials (like setting up a graphical user interface, sound or a touchpad).

For a list of applications that may be of interest, see List of applications.

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